• YopM Crystal Structure

    Crystal structure of the Yersinia virulence protein YopM

    Courtesy of: Cookson Lab

  • Bacteriophage in biofilm

    Filamentous bacteriophage organizing the biofilm matrix into a liquid crystal
    Courtesy: Singh Lab

     

     

  • Quorum sensing in Vibrio fischeri

    Lux genes coding for light production are activated by quorum sensing at high cell density. The light produced by the bacteria exposed the film for the image.
     
    Courtesy: Greenberg Lab

     

     

  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Colonies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa expressing different amounts of exopolysaccharides.

    Courtesy of: Harwood Lab

  • HIV-1 Envelope Evolution

    Reconstructed phylogenetic network of HIV-1 envelope sequences (C2-V5) from subtype B.

    Courtesy of: Mullins Lab

  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa in co-culture

    Structural component of bacterial targeting type VI secretion system P. aeruginosa (green) assembled in presence of competitor organism (red).

    Courtesy of: Mougous Lab

  • Emergence of Highly Pathogenic Clones of Escherichia coli

    Genetic typing of uropathogeic E. coli reveals strong association of some clones with high sensitivity or extreme resistance to multiple antibiotics.

    Courtesy: Sokurenko Lab

  • Inflammatory Death of Mouse Macrophages

    Mouse macrophages undergoing pyroptosis.

    Courtesy of: Cookson Lab

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Latest News

Microbiology Professor Evgeni Sokurenko's Seattle biotech startup, ID Genomics is developing a solution to that conundrum: a system that tests the biological “fingerprint” of a bacteria and connects it to a huge database to determine what bacteria it is, and what the best treatment is. Click here to read the full article. 

UW Micro has done well on yet another international ranking of Microbiology programs, with the Center for World University Rankings listing our department as the third best in the world behind Harvard and John Hopkins. See the list here.

Professor Carrie Harwood and colleagues have engineered a bacterium that can take carbon dioxide from the air and turn it into fuel in a single enzymatic step. The process draws on sunlight to produce methane and hydrogen inside the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in essence reversing combustion. These engineered bacteria could guide scientists toward better carbon-neutral biofuels. Read more about the research here.

Upcoming Events

Tuesday, April 25, 2017
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T-639
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Friday, April 28, 2017
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T-639
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Tuesday, May 9, 2017
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Friday, May 12, 2017
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