• YopM Crystal Structure

    Crystal structure of the Yersinia virulence protein YopM

    Courtesy of: Cookson Lab

  • HIV-1 Envelope Evolution

    Reconstructed phylogenetic network of HIV-1 envelope sequences (C2-V5) from subtype B.

    Courtesy of: Mullins Lab

  • Quorum sensing in Vibrio fischeri

    Lux genes coding for light production are activated by quorum sensing at high cell density. The light produced by the bacteria exposed the film for the image.
     
    Courtesy: Greenberg Lab

     

     

  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa in co-culture

    Structural component of bacterial targeting type VI secretion system P. aeruginosa (green) assembled in presence of competitor organism (red).

    Courtesy of: Mougous Lab

  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Colonies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa expressing different amounts of exopolysaccharides.

    Courtesy of: Harwood Lab

  • Inflammatory Death of Mouse Macrophages

    Mouse macrophages undergoing pyroptosis.

    Courtesy of: Cookson Lab

  • Bacteriophage in biofilm

    Filamentous bacteriophage organizing the biofilm matrix into a liquid crystal
    Courtesy: Singh Lab

     

     

  • Emergence of Highly Pathogenic Clones of Escherichia coli

    Genetic typing of uropathogeic E. coli reveals strong association of some clones with high sensitivity or extreme resistance to multiple antibiotics.

    Courtesy: Sokurenko Lab

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Latest News

Applications are invited for a 12-month full time Lecturer position in the Department of Microbiology.  This is a non-tenure track appointment with the expectation of renewable 3-5 year terms.  An M.S. or Ph.D. degree in the biological sciences is required, and preference will be given to applicants with teaching experience in microbiology lecture and laboratory courses.  Please see the University of Washington Academic HR site for more information. https://ap.washington.edu/ahr/academic-jobs/position/aa25086/

A new study describes how head-on collisions between protein machines on chromosomes can disrupt DNA replication and boost the rate of gene mutations that help bacteria survive hostile environments, resist antibiotics, and blunt attacks by immune defenses.

Microbiology Professor Evgeni Sokurenko's Seattle biotech startup, ID Genomics is developing a solution to that conundrum: a system that tests the biological “fingerprint” of a bacteria and connects it to a huge database to determine what bacteria it is, and what the best treatment is. Click here to read the full article. 

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