• Quorum sensing in Vibrio fischeri

    Lux genes coding for light production are activated by quorum sensing at high cell density. The light produced by the bacteria exposed the film for the image.
    Courtesy: Greenberg Lab



  • Bacteriophage in biofilm

    Filamentous bacteriophage organizing the biofilm matrix into a liquid crystal
    Courtesy: Singh Lab



  • Emergence of Highly Pathogenic Clones of Escherichia coli

    Genetic typing of uropathogeic E. coli reveals strong association of some clones with high sensitivity or extreme resistance to multiple antibiotics.

    Courtesy: Sokurenko Lab

  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa in co-culture

    Structural component of bacterial targeting type VI secretion system P. aeruginosa (green) assembled in presence of competitor organism (red).

    Courtesy of: Mougous Lab

  • YopM Crystal Structure

    Crystal structure of the Yersinia virulence protein YopM

    Courtesy of: Cookson Lab

  • Inflammatory Death of Mouse Macrophages

    Mouse macrophages undergoing pyroptosis.

    Courtesy of: Cookson Lab

  • HIV-1 Envelope Evolution

    Reconstructed phylogenetic network of HIV-1 envelope sequences (C2-V5) from subtype B.

    Courtesy of: Mullins Lab

  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Colonies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa expressing different amounts of exopolysaccharides.

    Courtesy of: Harwood Lab


Latest News

Professor Carrie Harwood and colleagues have engineered a bacterium that can take carbon dioxide from the air and turn it into fuel in a single enzymatic step. The process draws on sunlight to produce methane and hydrogen inside the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in essence reversing combustion. These engineered bacteria could guide scientists toward better carbon-neutral biofuels. Read more about the research here.

Eleven undergraduate students were honored with various awards on June 2 during the department's annual celebration for graduating seniors and for current students demonstrating outstanding achievement.

The Microbiology Department welcomes our newest faculty member, Jenny Hyde, Ph.D. 

Dr. Hyde comes to us from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, where she had her post-doctoral appointment. She completed her Ph.D. at the University of Queensland. Dr. Hyde's research focus is in virology.

Upcoming Events

Friday, October 21, 2016
Tuesday, October 25, 2016
Speaker: Dr Sebastian Winter
Host: Dr Michelle Reniere
Friday, October 28, 2016
Tuesday, November 1, 2016
Hogness Auditorium
Speaker: Dr Stanley Falkow
Wednesday, November 2, 2016
Host: Microbiology Admin Team